Birdies

A small assortment of accumulated bird pictures.

But is having colouration like a gravel road a sensible survival adaptation? (Ruffed grouse)
Prison guard. (Northern rough-winged sparrow)
Blending in. (Alder flycatcher)
Serenity. (Barrow’s golden eye)

Incidentally WordPress no longer allows me to edit published posts in any way, so whatever typos I make are now permanent.

Over Winter

I was surprised to find the game camera at the cabin stayed working over the Winter. It took some pictures of interesting visitors. The first one was the very next picture after I had left with my last load of wood (albeit in the next month).

Cougar

Some of the visitors were more “ordinary”.

Mule deer

Some were totally unwelcome!

Trespassers = cougar food.

Some came by night!

You can tell it’s a moose but …

I’ve been trying to get a good moose picture for years! Lots of them about, but they are elusive.

Baby bears aren’t uncommon either. Other shots showed he was traveling with a sibling – and mama!

Little black bear

I’m not exactly certain, but I think this is a wolverine! Never seen one here before. Possibly a fisher.

Wolverine? (Not the Marvel version.)

This morning I was visited by three otters, which also are not usual here.

River otter at the lake.

In fact even the birds have been unusual this year, with first the Barrow’s Goldeneye …

Barrow’s Goldeneye.

And then a pair of surf scoters:

Surf Scoters

Meanwhile work progresses. I won’t bother with any of those photos until I get to the point where it looks like something.

Finally back to the cabin

What with one thing and another (especially weather) it has taken me quite some time to get back out in the woods and pick up where I left off rather suddenly last fall.

Yes that’s snow.

Not only was there still snow in the dark shadows and along the road edge, but the road itself was like a lunar surface – after a heavy artillery barrage. The first 4 kilometers could best be described as “shredded”. After that … well they were grading the one section known for staying flat, hard, and smooth so I guess that explains it. No one told them they’re supposed to do the bumpy bits.

Think of it as ready-to-slice firewood.

Although not actually blocking my route, there are plenty of trees down. Again. Some of it will be fine firewood, other bits are just in the way. The notorious “new path” between the two routes is blocked again, as it is every year. Eventually there will be no trees left on that triangle of land.

Dock? Not any more.

Although the lake was not as high this year as last, it has done some damage. As of my arrival the wind was too choppy to put the water line out (I have no desire to be knocked over by a wave and drowned, or even just doused). Perhaps I can get to that tomorrow. When it’s supposed to snow. Spring? Not ’round here, mate!

Mr. & Mrs. Goldeneye (it’s a kind of waterfowl).

I brought along only two cameras this time: the venerable (if cantankerous) Nikon P610 and the Canon 1Ds (to try it out on landscape shots). The weather is cloudy so I didn’t get any beautiful snow-capped mountain pictures on the way in. Besides I forgot my concocted CF card reader so I can’t off-load from the Canon. I also forgot the micro SD adapter so I can’t check the video from my new toy:

New & cheap action/dashcam.

We’ll see what tomorrow brings. Other than snow, I mean. I have a huge amount of work to do all over the place here. Again. But at least nothing got destroyed over the Winter.

Water birds

Just when I was thinking I would run out of subjects …

On a necessary trip to the transfer station I passed by the over-flowing Bridge Creek, which was being enjoyed by a few visitors.

DSCN2278
Canadian Geese
cangoose
They are exempt from social distancing
DSCN2280
Common Merganser, which is uncommon around here
merganser
Post-shoot zoom-in
DSCN2279
Bufflehead – no, really; that’s what it’s called
bufflehead
Digital zoom-in

Fortunately I had the Nikon with me as the ‘single bird’ shots are at full focal length – 1440mm. The Canon’s 250mm would not have caught much detail as the birds were a long ways off. That is the one disadvantage of that camera: there is no way to get that kind of focal length without spending huge money and getting a lens normally associated with astronomical research. This is where the ultra-small 1/2.3 sensor shines. (If there had been sun the pictures would have been much better.)