Cabin update (the dull stuff)

So I’m back out in the middle of nowhere less than a week after visiting the ER. Couple of new prescriptions including nitro – so I can blow this place up if it all goes wahoonie-shaped? Probably not.

The trip out was ‘fun’: they’ve been ‘fixing’ the road. This consists of running the grader over the smooth bits to roughen them up so the rough bits don’t seem so bad by comparison. The one stretch of 2kms where you could do 80 before is down to a 60 zone – and watch out for the potholes. Some of it is now sludgy mud because that’s what you get when it rains on hard surface which then gets ripped up by heavy machinery. I wonder if there’s anyone in that company who understands even the basic concept of “road maintenance”.

Anyway it’s time to get something done. Except that the first thing that happen was one of the kitchen lights failed. We had them in the old house for decades with incandescent lights heating away … and now out here being lightly used with cool LED bulbs they decide to fail. Okay, two new sockets to get next time I’m in town; I’ll rebuild both so there’s no more of that foolishness.

On with the ceiling! That means a lot of planning and careful triple-checking of measurements, followed by a lot of overhead work. Also got a tub surround to go in so I’d better finish prepping for that too. Meanwhile here’s a couple of pictures of what I got done last time:

Trench warfare: underground power line from the generator shed.
Now you don’t see it.

The rest was mostly disassembly and preparing things for rebuilding. That takes longer than putting things together, but is essential to the job going right.

I’ll post a series of pictures of the bathroom rehab when I get it done. If I get it done. In the meantime, enjoy the view:

Snow melt has been slow this year.

I have to start the generator again because it’s rainy again and probably light the fire again because it’s cool again. Another “year without a Summer”. So far. Let’s just hope it doesn’t suddenly turn dry and hot and light everything on fire. Again.

What I’ve been up to

The big project this month (or indeed this year) was the replacement of the flooring in the main section of the cabin. It’s almost 600 square feet, and up until now has been a collection of mis-matched and crumbling vinyl sheet goods, rotting old industrial carpet, and bare plywood. All uneven and tattered and really, really ugly. Even with rugs down the ugly came through.

The replacement wasn’t easy as it could only be done in sections; there was no place to move everything to in order to get one big empty space to work in and on. So I compressed everything into one end of the building and got at it.

There were places where the subfloor was rotted due to past roof leaks. Mould clung to the old vinyl as well. Clean-up, cut out, throw out. After that new underlay had to go down to build up the level to where the end vinyl planking would match the existing tile kitchen and bath floors, as well as the laminate I succeeded in installing in the bedroom last year. Vinyl was the only choice here, as the floor structure and surface and very uneven. It slopes off in various directions and dips and rises. “Undulates” would be one way of describing it.

Here are some of the progress pictures. Even though you can’t see what it started out like, you can see it is now much better. Not done yet, of course; it’s a house and houses are never finished.

First section completed.
Second section completed. (Note how everything is crammed into the far end.)
Third section completed.

Of course most of it will be covered in furniture and rugs (dogs slip on vinyl) anyway but it will be contiguous, and even (but not level) wherever it is.

If you’re wondering why I didn’t level the whole thing and put in, say, hardwood I assure you that was not a practical option: straightening up a log cabin that was built wrong to begin with and then had 70 years to settle as it wished is not a simple thing. Most likely it would have suffered major structural damage with any attempt to rapidly push it back to level, and as for other methods of flattening the surface (like self-leveling concrete) the distortion was too extreme for that to be viable. Example: I measured one spot as sloping 2″ in 4′, far beyond what can be simply filled or raised with shims.

We’re not after ‘perfect’ here. That would require a complete replacement of the whole building. Just “good enough”, and certainly far better than it’s ever been.