Look! Up in the sky!

It’s strange because our airports are basically shut down, yet I keep seeing jets overhead.

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Fed Ex
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Atlas Air

When I’m at the cabin the view overhead is a bit different:

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Bald Eagle

Of course we get water traffic as well:

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Common Loon

In the woods you can hear lots of birds, but you usually can’t see them. Here’s one I did see:

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American Robin

I got some work done while I was there, but didn’t quite finish the job. Oh well, at least the scenery is nice:

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3 from camera ‘A’, 3 from camera ‘B’

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Raven in flight

I like the way the feather motion is a blur at the edges.

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I’m on fire

This is about the light, not the composition. I couldn’t due much with the composition.

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Spring robin

The light is finally getting to where I can get colour on these birds and I’m not always shooting silhouettes.

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Reflect

The melt water makes for some temporary opportunities.

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Metal bird

Amazing how many jets pass over here given the extreme drop in air traffic.

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Marley the dog

For once not being a goofball. Usually if the camera is out she is hamming it up.

Cameras used: Nikon P610 and Lumix ZS60.

Toy Camera

Inspired by Ritchie Roesch’s Digital Holga experiment.

Since my Panasonic Lumix ZS60 takes lousy photos anyway, it’s the perfect choice for turning on the “toy camera filter” and giving it a try. The Canon also has this “feature”, but it’s a bit silly to downgrade the quality of its lenses when the Lumix is pretty fuzzy to begin with. The Lumix results are A-okay, and simply a matter of whether or not the style is to your taste.

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Dreamscape
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Nebulous Moon
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The tall tree
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Distant flight
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This one hardly looks affected
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Marley hurries into Spring

Due to the erratic nature of the Lumix’s exposure control, all of these had to be adjusted a bit post-shoot in order to look ‘right’ – although what ‘right’ is under the circumstances can be debated.

So it’s quite the artistic little camera, but it does bring up a point I often try to make: why spend money to get soft images (as in buying certain low-quality lenses) when you can come by them so easily? Getting a good, sharp, realistic picture is the difficult bit. If your camera can achieve that, changing the look ‘downward’ after shooting is easy. The Lumix, alas, does not manage to make good pictures to begin with. It’s like buying a digital Holga – when you hadn’t intended to.